Gladwell explains himself

Malcolm Gladwell has a legion of critics, and he rarely defends himself against them directly – I guess his book sales, and his reach, are testament enough to what he does so uniquely. Which is why this reaction to criticism from one particular source – the social scientist Christopher Chabris – is so interesting. It almost amounts to a Gladwell manifesto:

The kinds of people who read books in America seem to have no problem with my writing. But I am clearly a bee in the bonnet of some of the kinds of people who review books in America. I think this has to do with the way in which my books are written. I write in the genre of what might be called ?intellectual adventure stories.? Books like David and Goliath combine narratives and ideas from academic research in an attempt to get people to look at the world a little differently. I have always tried to be honest about the shortcomings of this approach. Stories necessarily involve ambiguity and contradiction. They do not always capture the full range of human experience. Their conclusions can seem simplified or idiosyncratic. But at the same time stories have extraordinary advantages. They can reach large numbers of people and move them and serve as the vehicle for powerful insights. The overwhelming majority of social scientists that I have encountered in my career appreciate this trade-off and respect writers like me for the efforts we have made to use storytelling to bring the amazing worlds of psychology and sociology to a broader audience.

via Malcolm Gladwell?s David and Goliath: He explains why Christopher Chabris? criticisms of his book were unreasonable.

 

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